Cooking with Koji

Specialising in homemade miso paste and home cooking classes.

Two jars of homemade miso paste

Miso made organically from a century-old recipe

Yoko Nakazawa

“Without the right ingredients, you can’t maintain good health and palate.”

Migrating to Australia from Japan, Yoko had to begin her life anew.

Yoko had knowledge of Japanese traditional cooking practices and knew how to make miso paste using koji – a culture made from fermented cooked rice or soya bean. Upon further research, she found that the Australian market lacked the production of an organically made miso.

Yoko went to a few local markets and was surprised to find that there was an interest in the product.

The Stepping Stones program provided Yoko with the opportunity to develop and explore marketing campaigns and learn about business in Australia. With this new knowledge she says she has “developed a new drive for business and the confidence to go for it”.

Hence her business, Cooking with Koji, was realised. To make miso, Yoko uses a traditional family recipe that is over 100 years old, which includes fermenting the product for one year. Yoko runs cooking classes where she demonstrates the use of the organic miso paste in a variety of traditional Japanese recipes, which also feature on her blog.

Location: Online or phone orders
Opening Hours: By appointment
Categories: food | home cooking | catering

Business owner: Yoko Nakazawa
Address: Home based - upon order
E-mail: Contact Yoko via her website
Find Cooking with Koji online: Website

Rice crackers, cucumber, chopsticks and a jar of miso paste, artfully displayed on a wooden board.
A Japanese meal including soup, pickles, sushi and chopsticks, garnished with herbs
Two jars of miso paste held in Yoko's hands.

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