Rights and meanings in later life

12 October 2014

As Australia's population ages, there is a need to broaden our understanding of the rights and contributions of older adults, in order to develop relevant policies and services.


Our first paper addressed the rights of older persons under current human rights law. The second examined the diversity of roles that have been open to older adults throughout history, belief systems and cultures. The third explored the personal stories of older Australians.

PAPERS

Marthe Fredvang and Simon Biggs 2012, The rights of older persons: protection and gaps under human rights law (PDF file, 264 KB)
This paper was submitted to the Fourth Session of the United Nations Open-Ended Working Group on Ageing, September 2013

Ashley Carr, Simon Biggs and Helen Kimberley 2013, Meanings of a long life: cultural, social and historical perspectives (PDF file, 1 MB)

Ashley Carr, Helen Kimberley and Simon Biggs 2013, Looking back, looking forward: interpreting personal stories in later life (PDF file, 741 KB)

Biggs, S 2014, 'Adapting to an ageing society:  the stick or the carrot?' Global Policy, 31 July.

The Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) acknowledges and understands its obligations under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and recognises that all children and young people have the right to be treated with respect and care, and to be safe from all forms of abuse. BSL has a zero tolerance towards child abuse.
Read the official statement signed by the Executive Director.

The Brotherhood recognises the harm that family violence causes and that freedom from violence is a basic human right.
We will support our staff, volunteers, clients and the community if they experience violence.

Find out more about the work of the Brotherhood

The Brotherhood of St Laurence acknowledges and recognises the Traditional Owners of the land upon which we live and work, and we pay our respects to their Elders both past and present.