Humanitarian migrants, work and economic security on the urban fringe: how policies and perceptions shape opportunities

07 November 2018

By Martina Boese, John van Kooy and Dina Bowman, 2018

Focusing narrowly on the employment of humanitarian migrants (including refugees) can obscure the challenges that these people face in settling in a new environment.


This study drew on interviews with service providers, employers and others in the City of Hume in Melbourne’s outer north to identify diverse perspectives on the needs of humanitarian migrants and the influence of policy and regulation on their economic security. 

Better outcomes for this group will require policy changes such as a redesign of mainstream employment services so providers can offer tailored support geared towards long-term benefits, and improved relocation and resettlement initiatives.

Download the report Humanitarian migrants, work and economic security on the urban fringe: how policies and perceptions shape opportunities (PDF, 1.6 MB)

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