Housing

In measuring social exclusion we found using the latest data (2014) that 70% of public housing tenants are socially excluded. One in three Australians living in public housing experience deep social exclusion.

These findings do not imply that public housing causes social exclusion. With public housing insufficient to meet demand, the priority for accommodation is the people with the greatest need.


Among private renters, one in four (26%) are socially excluded, with 7% experiencing deep exclusion. This poses questions for government about how social policies affect disadvantaged people who are private renters.

On the positive side, home owners with mortgages have a lower rate of social exclusion (12%) than people in other housing situations.

Over the 2004–15 period, social exclusion decreased slightly for people in most housing situations. However, the percentage of public housing tenants experiencing social exclusion grew from 2008, with 70% excluded and 33% deeply excluded in 2014.

The graph immediately below shows all social exclusion, which is the total of marginal social exclusion and deep social exclusion. The second graph shows deep exclusion only.

Graph of all social exclusion by housing tenure, Australia, 2005 to 2014

To copy this graph for your own use, right-click on the image (or control-click on a Mac) and paste the graph into your document. Please credit 'The Brotherhood of St Laurence and the Melbourne Institute 2016'.

See data table for this graph and note on updated indicators

Graph of deep social exclusion by housing tenure, Australia, 2005 to 2014

To copy this graph for your own use, right-click on the image (or control-click on a Mac) and paste the graph into your document. Please credit 'The Brotherhood of St Laurence and the Melbourne Institute 2016'.

See data table for this graph and note on updated indicators


Who experiences social exclusion? See results by


The social exclusion monitor is the work of the Brotherhood of St Laurence and the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research (MIAESR). This page was updated using analysis of Wave 14 of the HILDA Survey in October 2016.

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The Brotherhood of St Laurence acknowledges and recognises the Traditional Owners of the land upon which we live and work, and we pay our respects to their Elders both past and present.