Youth Unemployment Monitor

A key part of our campaign is the Monitor, an enewsletter which is a useful source of information and policy analysis. But it's not all facts and figures. We present the human stories of youth unemployment and the challenges young people face today.


Latest monitor

NOVEMBER 2016

WISE WORDS
In the aftermath of his father’s fatal shooting by a teenager radicalised by ISIS ideology, high school teacher Alpha Cheng draws strength from the values of his migrant family – and hopes for a more inclusive Australia.

Read more »

Alpha Cheng

ROADBLOCKS TO WORK: TRANSPORT CHALLENGES YOUTH 

The Brotherhood of St Laurence’s latest data analysis shows, strikingly, that 61 per cent of unemployed people aged under 25 lack a driver’s licence. Drilling down, the percentage of jobseekers aged 18 to 25 with no licence is more than 40 per cent. And, overall, as many as a quarter of young jobseekers cite transport issues as a key reason for not being able to find a job.

In October this year, 268,000 youth in the labour market were unable to find work.

READ MORE: U-turn: the transport woes of Australia's young jobseekers (PDF, 182KB) »


VIDEO: Enter the workplace with our youth

Real world work experience is a key component in supporting young people on a pathway to employment.


Previous monitors

MARCH 2016

WISE WORDS
Australian of the Year ‘Local Hero’ Catherine Keenan joins our youth jobs campaign. The one certainty today’s young people can count on is that their world will constantly change, the youth educator says.
Read more »


NEW DATA: WHERE ARE THE YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT HOTSPOTS IN AUSTRALIA? 

The Brotherhood of St Laurence has pulled together key ABS data to identify the 20 worst performing areas for youth unemployment in Australia.

Our 2016 snapshot of the nation’s youth unemployment hotspots found rural and regional locations rank among the hardest hit communities. The analysis lists four regional areas where unemployment rates for 15 to 24 year olds surpassed 20 per cent.

We’ve also done a state by state breakdown to map hotspots in each state and territory.

READ MORE: Australia's youth unemployment hotspots » (PDF, 512KB) 


VIDEO: Working hard for her chance

Voice for a generation: despite numerous applications, Shanna, 21, has only secured two short-term jobs since finishing school in 2012. In this video, she talks about the challenges she faces in her job search which is complicated by living far from the city. Her resilience shines through her adversity. 


NOVEMBER 2015

WISE WORDS 
Businessman David Gonski led a major review of school funding. In this column for the Brotherhood's campaign for youth employment, he reflects on how education and skills shape life chances. 
Read more »

David Gonski

NEW DATA: YOUNG AND BURDENED

Australia’s young men and young women are experiencing joblessness differently. Today, teenage boys and young men who are in the labour market are more likely to be unemployed. Meanwhile, young women are more likely to be underemployed – to have some work but wanting more hours, and so not counted in the official unemployment rates.

As the two sexes face different hurdles in their job search, the 2008 global financial crisis continues to cast a long shadow. The overall youth unemployment rates for those aged 15 to 24 years sits at above 13 per cent – a level not experienced here since the early 2000s. 
Read the report: Paying a price » (PDF) 



MARCH 2015

WISE WORDS 
'My resume does not read like most politicians. I left school at 15 and moved out of home soon after. It’s the first time I’ve revealed these details in public, and my hope is that my story will highlight how crushing it is to be young and unemployed in Australia.'
Senator Ricky Muir provides a raw personal insight into his experience of being unemployed in his column. 
Read more »

VIDEO
Senator Ricky Muir speaks out on youth unemployment – and reveals he left school at 15 – in our video.
Watch »

Senator Ricky Muir

REPORT: TEENAGE DREAM UNRAVELS
The dreams of Australia’s unemployed youth are being shattered as the nation’s unemployment rate overall climbs. More than 290,000 Australians aged 15 to 24 were categorised as unemployed in January. Worst hit were the 15 to 19-year-olds, with the unemployment rate for this group hitting 20 per cent – a level not seen since the mid-1990s. 
Read more (PDF) »


A YOUTH TRANSITIONS SERVICE FOR AUSTRALIA
Tackling youth unemployment is a complex issue, but key answers can be found in our Youth Transitions Service which is currently motivating young people in unemployment hotspots in outer Melbourne. Read more (PDF) »


SEPTEMBER 2014

WISE WORDS
'Let us be clear – youth unemployment is not a ‘young people’ issue. It is a societal, generational issue.'

Hear from Amy Rhodes and Laura Sobels (pictured), Australian delegates to the Y20. Read more »


REPORT: BARELY WORKING
New analysis shows that by mid-2014, more than 15 per cent of workers in the 15-24 group were underemployed. Read more (PDF) »


VIDEO
Watch a video in which Kevin, 21, who counts as underemployed, talks about what it's like to work 10 hours a week. Watch video »


HEALTH AND UNEMPLOYMENT LINKED: BUSINESS LOBBY
Read Kate Carnell's speech to the National Press Club (PDF) »


APRIL 2014

WISE WORDS
'I believe there is a special case for taking an interest in youth unemployment. It is concerning that more than one-third of the unemployed people in Australia are aged 15 to 24.'
Dr Ken Henry, former Treasury Secretary, writes on his interest in youth unemployment.
Read »


REPORT: ON THE TREADMILL
A new analysis by the Brotherhood of St Laurence reveals more than 50,000 people aged between 15 and 24 nationwide have now been on the unemployment treadmill for more than a year. Unemployment is increasingly far from a ‘passing phase’ for many young people today. Read report (PDF) »


CLARION CALL
The Business Council of Australia president, Catherine Livingstone, declares youth unemployment "one of the greatest priorities for government and business to tackle." Read (PDF) »


VIDEO
James, 21, hasn't had a job since finishing high school, despite his efforts to find work. Hear from James »

Hear from Chris, 24, who has been unemployed for three years. Watch »


MEDIA RELEASE
Over 50,000 young Australians now classified as long-term unemployed.
Read more »


MARCH 2014

WISE WORDS
Russel Howcroft, Executive General Manager Channel 10, shares his story of leaving school and entering the workforce in his Wise Words column.
Read more »


REVEALED: YOUTH JOBLESS SPIKES
The new analysis by the Brotherhood of St Laurence of the latest Australian Bureau of Statistics labour force data shows severe increases in youth unemployment in many parts of Australia, particularly in regional and rural areas. Read the full snapshot (PDF) »


MAPS
To view maps showing the areas in individual states where youth unemployment has spiked most dramatically over the past two years, click here »


MEDIA RELEASE
Youth unemployment jumps 88 per cent in parts of Australia. Read more »


FEBRUARY 2014

WISE WORDS
'Today we are seeing youth unemployment figures that have reached crisis point,' writes John Hartigan, former CEO of News Limited in the first Monitor. 
Read more »

Read John Hartigan's wise words column

SNAPSHOT OF YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT 2014
The Brotherhood of St Laurence has pulled together key data to help you understand the pressing issue of youth unemployment in Australia. Read more »


VIDEO
Troy, 19, had been looking for a job for over a year. Listen to his thoughts on how hard it can be to find work with no experience or networks. Watch »


Contact

For all media enquiries contact: 
Jeannie Zakharov. Senior Communications Manager
Phone: 0428 391 117
Email: jzakharov(at)bsl.org.au

For information on the Youth Unemployment Monitor, email the Principal Advisor, Public Affairs and Policy: ffarouque(at)bsl.org.au

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