Investing in our future: an evaluation of the national rollout of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY): final report

21 September 2011

By Max Liddell, Tony Barnett, Fatoumata Diallo Roost and Juliet McEachran 2011

Read the national evaluation of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY).


A national evaluation of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY), a combined home and centre-based early childhood enrichment program that supports parents in their role as their child’s first teacher, has found significant benefits for parents and children.

The effectiveness of HIPPY was evaluated by means of a two-year longitudinal, quasi-experimental research design that involved a comparison group drawn from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children using propensity score matching.

Download the report » (142 pages, PDF, 1.7 MB)

The Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) acknowledges and understands its obligations under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and recognises that all children and young people have the right to be treated with respect and care, and to be safe from all forms of abuse. BSL has a zero tolerance towards child abuse.
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The Brotherhood recognises the harm that family violence causes and that freedom from violence is a basic human right.
We will support our staff, volunteers, clients and the community if they experience violence.

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